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  • Kenko Desk

Invest In The Next Generation - Vaccination For Kids 👶🏽

Every year in India, approximately 500,000 children die from preventable diseases due to inadequate vaccination coverage.


In 2018, India had a basic immunization coverage rate of just 65% for children. Currently, the World Health Organization reports that around 25 million children under the age of one have not received basic vaccines globally.


These statistics can be overwhelming, but it's important to stay informed about the vaccines that can protect your children. Here is a vaccination schedule to help you keep track of the vaccines your children need.


When your child is born...


These immunisation vaccines are to be given right at birth.


1. BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin)

  • Frequency: This is a single-dose vaccine.

  • How it is administered: Injection on the upper arm.

  • What it does: Protects against tuberculosis.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Soreness or discharge on the injection spot

  • High temperature

  • Swollen glands under the armpit


2. Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)

  • Frequency: First dose at birth. Second dose at six weeks. The third dose at ten weeks old, and the last dose at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects: None

3. Hepatitis B

  • Frequency: This is a single-dose vaccine.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against Hepatitis B.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Possible redness and soreness where the injection was given.

  • This is an inactivated (dead) vaccine, so it cannot cause the infection itself.


In six weeks...


The next set of immunisation vaccines is administered when the child is six weeks old.


1. Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)

  • Frequency: This is the second dose to be taken at six weeks. Two more remain.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects: None


2. Pentavalent

  • Frequency: First dose at six weeks old. Second dose at ten weeks old. The last dose at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Hib.

  • Potential side effects:

  • There may be swelling, redness and pain at the injection site.

  • Possibility of fever for a short time after immunisation.

  • Symptoms usually appear the day after vaccination and last for 1-3 days.


3. Rotavirus Vaccine (RVV)

  • Frequency: First dose at six weeks old. Second dose at ten weeks old. The last dose at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against rotaviruses, the most common cause of severe diarrhoeal disease in infants and young children.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Side effects are rare and mild.

  • Diarrhoea, vomiting and irritation are the only probable side effects.


4. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV)

  • Frequency: First dose at six weeks old. Second and last dose at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against meningitis, septicemia and pneumonia to milder infections such as sinusitis and otitis media.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Redness

  • Swelling

  • Pain or tenderness

  • Fever

  • Loss of appetite


5. Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV)

  • Frequency: First dose at six weeks old. Second and last dose at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Like OPV, this also protects from the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Soreness

  • Fever


In ten weeks...


After your child is immunised at six weeks, their next set of immunisations is when they’re ten weeks old.


1. Pentavalent

  • Frequency: This is the Second dose at ten weeks. The last dose is at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Hib.

  • Potential side effects:

  • There may be swelling, redness and pain at the injection site.

  • Possibility of fever for a short time after immunisation.

  • Symptoms usually appear the day after vaccination and last for 1-3 days.


2. Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)

  • Frequency: This is the third dose to be taken at ten weeks. One more remaining.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects: None


3. Rotavirus Vaccine (RVV)

  • Frequency: This is the Second dose at ten weeks. The last dose is at 14 weeks old.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against rotaviruses, the most common cause of severe diarrhoeal disease in infants and young children.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Side effects are rare and mild.

  • Diarrhoea, vomiting and irritation are the only probable side effects.


In 14 weeks...


This is the last set of immunisation vaccines for your newborn baby. The next set of vaccines would be near their first birthdays.


1. Pentavalent

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Hib.

  • Potential side effects:

  • There may be swelling, redness and pain at the injection site.

  • Possibility of fever for a short time after immunisation.

  • Symptoms usually appear the day after vaccination and last for 1-3 days.


2. Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects: None


3. Rotavirus Vaccine (RVV)

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Orally.

  • What it does: Protects against rotaviruses, the most common cause of severe diarrhoeal disease in infants and young children.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Side effects are rare and mild.

  • Diarrhoea, vomiting and irritation are the only probable side effects.


4. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV)

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against meningitis, septicemia and pneumonia to milder infections such as sinusitis and otitis media.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Redness

  • Swelling

  • Pain or tenderness

  • Fever

  • Loss of appetite


5. Inactivated Polio Vaccine (fIPV)

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Like OPV, this also protects from the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Soreness

  • Fever


In 9 to 12 months...


Now that your kid is nearing their first birthday, you would want to immunise them against a host of other diseases.


1. Measles & Rubella (MR)

  • Frequency: The first dose is to be administered between 9-12 months. The second and final dose is between 16-24 months.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against measles and rubella.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Redness, swelling and sore feeling for 2 to 3 days

  • Around 7 to 11 days post the injection, and kids may feel a bit unwell or develop a high temperature for 2 or 3 days


2. Japanese Encephalitis (JE-1)

  • Frequency: The first dose is to be administered between 9-12 months. The second and final dose is between 16-24 months.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against Japanese Encephalitis, Asia’s main cause of viral encephalitis.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Fever, though rarely.

  • Headache or muscle aches.

  • Pain, tenderness, redness, or swelling around the vaccine shot.


3. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine - Booster*

  • Frequency: This is a single-dose vaccine.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, meningitis, and bacteremia.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Redness/swelling

  • Loss of appetite

  • Irritability

  • Fever

  • Increased crying


In 16 to 24 months...


This is the final batch of immunisations for infants. After this, they would be adolescents when they would need more immunisations.


1. Measles & Rubella (MR)

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against measles and rubella.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Redness, swelling and sore feeling for 2 to 3 days

  • Around 7 to 11 days post the injection, and kids may feel a bit unwell or develop a high temperature for 2 or 3 days


2. Japanese Encephalitis (JE-2)

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects against Japanese Encephalitis, Asia’s main cause of viral encephalitis.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Fever, though rarely.

  • Headache or muscle aches.

  • Pain, tenderness, redness, or swelling around the vaccine shot.


3. Diphtheria Pertussis & Tetanus (DPT)

  • Frequency: The first dose is to be administered between 16-24 months. The second and final dose is between 5-6 years.

  • How it is administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects from diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Soreness or swelling around the vaccine shot.

  • Fever.

  • Irritation.

  • Exhaustion.

  • Loss of appetite


4. Oral Polio Vaccine – Booster

  • Frequency: This is a single-dose vaccine.

  • How it is administered: Orally

  • What it does: This vaccine also protects against the poliovirus.

  • Potential side effects: None


In 5 to 6 years...


These are the adolescent years of your children, and they need to play carefree. Help them by giving them immunisation vaccines.


1. Diphtheria Pertussis & Tetanus (DPT) - Booster 2

  • Frequency: This is the last dose.

  • How is it administered: Injection.

  • What it does: Protects from diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus

  • Potential side effects:

  • Soreness or swelling around the vaccine shot.

  • Fever.

  • Irritation.

  • Exhaustion.

  • Loss of appetite.


In 10 years...


Your child is about to enter his teenage. It is bound that parents worry about their children. The least you can do is give them immunisation vaccines.


1. Tetanus & adult Diphtheria (Td)

  • Frequency: This is a single-dose vaccine.

  • How it is administered: Injection

  • What it does: Protects against tetanus, contracted through infected cuts or wounds with the spores of the bacterium Clostridium tetani.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Pain.

  • Redness or swelling around the vaccine shot.

  • Mild fever.

  • Headache.

  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, or stomachache.


In 16 years...


The kids are in their teenage years and are almost adults. They can take care of themselves. However, you can give them the gift of one last immunisation vaccine.


1. Tetanus & adult Diphtheria (Td)

  • Frequency: This is a single-dose vaccine.

  • How it is administered: Injection

  • What it does: Protects against tetanus.

  • Potential side effects:

  • Pain.

  • Redness or swelling around the immunisation shot.

  • Mild fever.

  • Exhaustion.

  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, or stomachache.


These are the essential immunisation vaccines that your kids need. Don’t skip out on these if you want a bright future for your kids. Under the Universal Immunisation Program, the beneficiaries can get all the vaccines for free.




If rising costs of medicines and other medical bills are making you worry, just subscribe to Kenko’s Family Plan at just ₹999/month and get up to 50% off on all OPD bills and many more health benefits.

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